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Amazon drone delivery approved by FAA

amazon drone delivery

The FAA has accepted Amazon drone delivery testing. Based on the FAA it has issued a particular airworthiness certificate to Amazon Prime Air, allowing the company to operate its MK 27 unmanned aircraft for R&D and crew training in authorized flight areas Amazon prime airplanes to use the aircraft to establish a package delivery operation here in the US Amazon says it can deliver packages within months now, Amazon has been testing this in other areas.

Do you want a drone to be delivering your package

As we live in apartments, no, we can’t do that. If you look at places like China, they have robots that get into the elevator to deliver something that’s not a drone.

I suppose that as a consumer, I think it would be great. I just feel like the logistical challenges because who’s operating the drone, where it’s how many can it handle per hour is it really going to be more efficient because I know the mailman shows up to the building with 40 packages right presumably, a drone is going to be one at the time is it actually a lot more efficient.

Amazon’s going to find all this stuff out. Maybe it is just a lot of hype, but it feels like they continue to push for making this a thing, and perhaps it does work better in rural areas.

What does that mean for drone hobbyists

This past weekend Amazon received a part 135 air carrier certificate; what does that mean for drone hobbyists. Basically, that certificate allows amazon to begin testing beyond the visual line of sites so they can conduct flights for package delivery.

Jeff Bezos had the vision to have 30-minute deliveries by 2018. Now because of regulation that is very much delayed and it’s going to be delayed even longer now this doesn’t mean that they will be delivering this Christmas or probably even next Christmas because there are a lot of regulations to be completed by the FAA yet namely remote-id has to happen before Amazon can start delivering, remote-id is sort of about safety.

What it’s about

Truly it’s about Amazon, Ups, Google, and many other large companies being able to make billions of dollars. It’s always about the money, so what does this mean for recreational drone pilots? Nothing quite yet, but it’s another step towards being pushed out of the airspace. I would say if you live near an Amazon distribution center, then this should be pretty concerning for you because it’s going to come sooner for all of you.

If you live in a rural community, this won’t affect you that much, at least not for a very long time remote-id has never been about safety in the way that it’s marketed it’s been about safety, yes but not to protect people in jumbo jets that would shrug off any drone collision like a mosquito on a windshield it’s to fill and protect the bank accounts of large companies and yes to mitigate drones crashing together in the skies above major cities, and having parts fall on the people below.

 

But it’s not about protecting jetliners governed skyways are on the way folks and they will restrict where recreational pilots will be able to fly no doubt, for now, I say continue to fly and enjoy the hobby as much as you can for the future, this is what I recommend I would consider getting a Mavic mini small drones are most likely going to be immune from many of these coming regulations.

Hopefully, the technology advances to the point where we won’t have to worry about remote-id I think innovation is going to drive manufacturers to create these amazing small drones that won’t have to comply with all of these regulations now this is just a personal opinion of mine this is not based on any research or anything like that.

What do you think?

Written by Nas

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